Dooley’s Flipped Shoelaces

by Marco Ornelas *

[Abajo hay una traducción.]

The golden age of rock ’n’ roll in Mexico was marked by what is known in Spanish as a cover (Federico Rubli, Estremécete y rueda: Loco por el rock & roll [México: Veerkamp-Arturo Chapa, 2007]). The cover of a song was nothing but a different wording which followed the melody of popular American or English rock ’n’ roll hits. Strictly speaking, they were not translations. They were “adaptations” of rock songs, taken mainly from Anglo-Saxon cultural milieus, and re-furnished to work in a different cultural environment.

Rubli’s book includes the first twenty years (1956-1976) after the introduction of rock-and-roll to Mexico. According to his view, rock ’n’ roll found its way into the musical taste of Mexican youths in four time periods. 1) The golden age of rock ’n’ roll (1956-1966), which includes the songs of early pioneers until the appearance, strengthening, and decline of rock groups of young and inexperienced musicians and their distinctive product: the cover. 2) The era of psychedelia, hippie culture and the flower-power movement (1967-1968). These years correspond to the first efforts to create original rock ’n’ roll songs, not necessarily in Spanish. 3) The peak of the efforts to create original rock mainly with English words, the so called Onda chicana, or Chicana Vibe, created by musicians from Tijuana who were in close contact with Blues and rock ’n’ roll music in the U.S. (1969-1971). And 4) the era of the fight for survival (1972-1976), when just a few rock groups found their way into a more refined and sophisticated music in an adverse social and political environment.

Are Rubli’s reflections about rock ’n’ roll in Mexico true enough? The question remains open, and these lines are an invitation to read his book and to look for an answer. In the meantime, I have chosen the Spanish and English versions of Pink Shoelaces, or Agujetas de color de rosa, one of the greatest hits of the golden age period, in order to give elements for a social history of rock ’n’ roll in Mexico and, hopefully, for a cross-cultural analysis. Let’s watch and listen:

I have a girlfriend who is a little silly
But I like her and love her truly
She is not very pretty but she is so crazy
Oh, she also wears leggings!

[She wears] shoelaces in pink color
And a big and ugly hat
The hat has feathers in
Light blue color

She likes [water] skiing and to ride in a boat
And to drive a car in great speed
If I take her to a party
She is a spinning wheel dancing at rock

[She wears] shoelaces in pink color
And a big and ugly hat
The hat has feathers in
Light blue color

She introduced me to her friends
And I happily stayed there
When I saw a blond girl I was impressed
Oh, she also wears leggings!

[She wears] shoelaces in pink color
And a big and ugly hat
The hat has feathers in
Light blue color

Now I’ve got a guy and his name is Dooley
He’s my guy and I love him truly
He’s not good lookin’, Heaven knows
But I’m wild about his crazy clothes

He wears tan shoes with pink shoelaces
A polka dot vest and man, oh, man
Tan shoes with pink shoelaces
And a big panama with a purple hat band

He takes me deep-sea fishing in a submarine
We got to drive-in movies in a limousine

He’s got a whirly-birdy and a twelve-foot yacht
Ah, but that’s-a not all he’s got

He’s got tan shoes with pink shoelaces
A polka dot vest and man, oh, man
Tan shoes with pink shoelaces
And a big panama with a purple hat band

Now Dooley had a feelin’ we were goin’ to war
So he went out and enlisted in a fightin’ corps
But he landed in the brig for raisin’ such a storm
When they tried to put ’em in a uniform

He wanted tan shoes with pink shoelaces
A polka dot vest and man, oh, man
He wanted tan shoes with pink shoelaces
And a big panama with a purple hat band

Now one day Dooley started feelin’ sick
And he decided that he better make his will out quick
He said “Just before the angels come to carry me
I want it down in writin’ how to bury me.”

Wearin’ tan shoes with pink shoelaces
A polka dot vest and man, oh, man.
Give me tan shoes with pink shoelaces
And a big panama with a purple hat band.

Are there any differences that are worth noticing? Yes, indeed, at least in three respects:

1. Lyrics and music. The English original makes good sense and the words follow pretty well a story line, a plot so to speak, which includes the use of sarcasm (If they’re gonna bury me, do it with my tan shoes with pink shoelaces…). The Spanish cover is good in building a story line, even though the plot is most innocuous and vain, to say the least. The music is well performed in both cases though I prefer the original version for the metal involved (sax), which plays a nice solo.

2. Who sings and who the song is addressed to. The most obvious difference in the songs is that while the original version is sung by a girl who speaks about her boyfriend, the Spanish cover represents quite the opposite: a boy who sings and talks about her girlfriend. Thus, in the original version the active party is a female, while in the Spanish cover, in accordance to a Hispanic cultural canon, ladies remain only as a subject matter boys talk about.

3. What the video clips communicate. The video of the English version depicts an intimate chat between girls (Dodie Stevens is on the phone in her bedroom). She uses the song to talk about a man who she is presumably infatuated with. Some people think that this was a subversive, clever and brave song (remember we are in 1959!) because the description of the guy may very well fit that of a black man. So, she is dating a black man! If this holds true, the song echoes attitudes that would spread and become counterculture in the years to come: to question the reality of social segregation (the civil rights movement) and to refuse enrollment for the Vietnam War (Dooley went to jail because he did not like the uniform; he prefers his tan shoes with pink shoelaces…). In this respect (social issues), the cover is well behind the original. It can only reflect, naively, that old people (most of the people dancing in the party look like the parents of the youngsters playing rock ’n’ roll) indulge with the music of their young ones.

It will always remain a debatable issue whether covers were an authentic output of rock ’n’ roll in Mexico, or if they were simply “cheap copies” of American or English hits (a sort of copycat cultural invasion), and found their way into the musical taste of the Mexican middle class of the early 1960s. Some argue that it might be both. What do you think?

 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 

Las agujetas volteadas de Dooley

por Marco Ornelas *

La época de oro del rock en México estuvo marcada por lo que se conoce en lenguaje musical como cover (Federico Rubli, Estremécete y rueda: Loco por el rock & roll [México: Veerkamp-Arturo Chapa, 2007]). El cover de una canción no era más que un parafraseo distinto que seguía la melodía de éxitos populares de rock estadunidenses o ingleses. En sentido estricto, no se trataba de traducciones sino de “adaptaciones” de canciones de rock, tomadas sobre todo de ámbitos culturales anglosajones y relaboradas para funcionar en ambientes culturales diferentes.

El libro de Rubli comprende los primeros veinte años (1956-1976) después de la introducción del rock en México. De acuerdo con su periodización, el rock se hizo de un lugar en el gusto musical de los jóvenes mexicanos en cuatro tiempos. 1) La época de oro del rock (1956-1966), que incluye las canciones de los pioneros hasta la aparición, fortalecimiento y declive de grupos de rock de jóvenes músicos inexpertos y de su producto característico: el cover. 2) La era de la psicodelia, la cultura hippie y el movimiento “flower power” (1967-1968). Estos años se corresponden con los primeros esfuerzos para crear canciones originales de rock, no necesariamente en español. 3) La cumbre de los esfuerzos por crear rock original, en especial con letras en inglés, la llamada Onda chicana, creada por músicos tijuanenses que estuvieron en estrecho contacto con el blues y el rock en Estados Unidos (1969-1971). Y 4) la era de la lucha por la sobrevivencia (1972-1976), cuando sólo unos cuantos grupos rockeros lograron componer música más refinada y sofisticada en un ambiente social y político por demás adverso.

¿Son suficientemente certeras las reflexiones de Rubli a propósito del rock en México? Esta es una pregunta que permanece abierta, y estas líneas son una invitación para leer el libro y buscar una respuesta. Entre tanto, he escogido las versiones española e inglesa de Agujetas de color de rosa, o Pink Shoelaces, uno de los más grandes éxitos de la época de oro, con el fin de proporcionar elementos para una historia social del rock en México y, de ser posible, para un análisis intercultural. Veamos y escuchemos:

Yo tengo una novia que es un poco tonta
Pero es mi gusto y yo la quiero mucho
No es muy bonita, pero está re loca
Oh sí, ella usa mallas también

Agujetas de color de rosa
Y un sombrero grande y feo
El sombrero lleva plumas
De color azul pastel

Le gusta esquiar y pasear en lancha
Y conducir un auto a gran velocidad
Si en una fiesta yo la llevo
Es un trompo bailando el rock

Agujetas de color de rosa
Y un sombrero grande y feo
El sombrero lleva plumas
De color azul pastel

A sus amigas me presentó
Y yo contento me quedé ahí
Al ver a una rubia me impresioné
Oh sí, ella usa mallas también

Agujetas de color de rosa
Y un sombrero grande y feo
El sombrero lleva plumas
De color azul pastel

Tengo un chico que se llama Dooley
Es mi novio y lo quiero de verdad
No es muy guapo que digamos
Pero su forma loca de vestir
me vuelve salvaje

Usa zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas
Un chaleco moteado que, válgame señor,
Zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas
Y un panamá con listón morado

Me lleva a pescar en altamar en un submarino
Llegamos al autocinema en una limousine
Tiene un helicóptero y un yate de 12 pies
 Y no sólo tiene eso sino también…

Usa zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas
Un chaleco moteado que, válgame señor,
Zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas
Y un panamá con listón morado

Dooley sintió que podríamos entrar en guerra
Así que fue y se enroló en un batallón
Pero lo metieron al bote por reclamar
Cuando trataron de meterlo en un uniforme

Quería zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas
Un chaleco moteado que, válgame señor,
Quería zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas
Y un panamá con listón morado

Hasta que un día Dooley comenzó a sentirse enfermo
Y decidió hacer de volada su testamento
Dijo: “Antes que los ángeles me lleven
Quiero estipular que me entierren

Con zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas
Un chaleco moteado que, válgame señor,
Dame zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas
Y un panamá con listón morado

¿Existen diferencias que valga la pena hacer notar? Claro que sí, en al menos tres aspectos:

1. Letras y música. El original inglés tiene un sentido bastante claro y de la narración bien se sigue una historia, una trama por decirlo así, que incluye sarcasmos (Si me han de enterrar, que lo hagan con mis zapatos cafés con agujetas rosas…). El cover también logra una narración fluida, aunque la trama aparezca mucho más inocua y banal, por decir lo menos. En los dos casos la música está bien llevada aunque prefiero la versión original con el sonido del metal (saxo), que se luce en el solo.

2. Quién canta y a quién se dirige la canción. La diferencia más obvia estriba en que mientras la versión original es cantada por una muchacha que habla de su novio, el cover hace exactamente lo contrario: un muchacho canta y habla de su novia. Así, en el original la muchacha es la parte activa, en tanto que en el cover, de acuerdo con el canon cultural hispano, las mujeres aparecen solamente como tema de conversación de los muchachos.

3. Lo que los videos comunican. El video original muestra una charla íntima entre mujeres (Dodie Stevens se encuentra en su recámara al teléfono). Ella utiliza la canción para hablar acerca de un muchacho de quien está enamorada. Algunos creen que la canción es subversiva, inteligente y valiente (¡recordemos que estamos en 1959!) porque la descripción que hace del muchacho muy bien podría coincidir con la de un hombre de color. ¡Ella está saliendo con un negro! Si esto es cierto, la canción hace eco de actitudes que se generalizarían con el paso del tiempo y se volverían contracultura: criticar la segregación social (movimiento de derechos civiles) y rechazar enlistarse en el ejército para ir a la guerra de Vietnam (Dooley fue a dar al bote porque no le gustaba el uniforme; prefiere sus zapatos cafés con agujetas rosadas…). A este respecto (las cuestiones sociales), el cover se queda muy atrás del original. Sólo muestra, con ingenuidad crasa, que los mayores (casi todos los que bailan en la fiesta parecen los papás de los jóvenes que están tocando rock) son indulgentes con la música de sus hijos.

Siempre será debatible la cuestión de si los covers constituyeron un producto auténtico del rock en México, o si fueron sencillamente “copias baratas” de éxitos musicales norteamericanos o ingleses (una especie de invasión cultural en serie), para de esta manera encontrar un lugar en el gusto musical de la afluente clase media mexicana de inicios de los años sesenta. Hay quien sostiene que las dos podrían ser ciertas. Y tú, ¿qué piensas?

[Traducción del autor]

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google+. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s